Annual Report

10 Ways to Create a Winning Annual Report [and How to Know What Your Reader Craves]

10 Ways to Create a Winning Annual Report [and How to Know What Your Reader Craves]

Your annual report may be your most important communication tool—and for good reason.

It offers an snapshot of company performance, shows how you are creating value for all of your stakeholders, and offers a glimpse into the passion and purpose that drives your organization.

17 Top Internal Communication Channels [Infographic]

 
 
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Video outperforms all other media in getting viewed and remembered. 

People remember 20% of what they hear, 30% of what they see, but 70% of what they see and hear. So it's no surprise that video is the most powerful communication tool there is. Video can combine arresting visuals with sound and motion, making it more engaging to the human brain than any other form of communication.

Video is versatile for internal communication too, because it comes in all price points and many formats—from whiteboard explainers and motion graphics to interview-driven or cinematic stories. It ranks fourth among most-used digital channels, with 81% of companies surveyed reportedly using it for internal communication, according to Gatehouse. 

This is why video is becoming a central part of internal communication plans.

 



Curious what video marketing can do for you?

Read our Definitive Guide to Video Marketing and find all of our tips and tricks to help your business grow. 


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A microsite is a simple website that is highly focused and makes it easy for the viewer to find exactly what they came for. This is in contrast to a general company website that is designed to deliver many different messages and risks losing the viewer before they find what you want them to read.

We highly recommend microsites for targeted large-scale internal communication initiatives for several reasons: They are quick to produce, effective, highly focused, and provide great analytics. 

For example, a microsite would work well to explain a merger or acquisition by featuring the primary content on the landing page—and having links that unpack the message in more detail.


Blogs are a versatile internal communication channel and come from leaders as well as employees and departments. The challenges are to keep it real, to keep it in the voice of the leader (if ghostwritten), and to keep the content coming. Most blogs fizzle when writers begin to see the work involved.

Still, they offer an inexpensive and personal way to communicate with employees—and can target special interests ranging from IT changes to personnel issues. They're also a good way to create more personal connections with a leader.

Bill Marriott's blog Marriott on the Move is a good example of a blog that carries a definite personal imprint of its author. DocInTheD is a physician and the CEO of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. You likely have blogs you follow that can inspire you with possibilities as well.


 

Facebook, YouTube,  Instagram, and Twitter are among the highest-traffic social media channels and can be targeted by interest groups, departments, or topics. These interactive channels can be suited to sharing ideas and issues and for monitoring feedback from employees.

The downside, of course, is that social media cannot be controlled, which means it remains one of the most challenging channels for communicators to monitor and influence.


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Enterprise communication apps that are dedicated to employee communication are on the rise, and for good reason. They provide a customizable channel for delivering text, audio, and video content to employees throughout the company—allowing employees to communicate beyond email and phone calls. 

Apps vary by vendor but can allow preference settings and be used to deliver:

  • News

  • Executive updates

  • Videos

  • Recognition

  • Blogs

  • Access to mission-critical sites for employees

  • Notifications

  • Surveys

While willingness to download an app for internal communication is growing, the issue of using one's personal device for work remains a challenge.


According to Gatehouse's annual State of the Sector report, email is still the most frequently used channel for internal communication (96% use it).

It can be challenging, however, to reach those whose inboxes are full or who don't have desk jobs. Here are some tips on getting your internal communication emails read.

1. Start with the main point in a single sentence.
We’re sometimes tempted to start at the beginning to tell the whole story, thinking that a reader needs to understand what led to the point. In some cases, this requires too much work for the reader to get to the point, so they abandon ship. Start with a summary statement that gives them enough information if they go no further—or a reason to proceed.

2. Invest in writing a good subject line.
This not only helps someone decide if he or she should read it, but helps them find it later. Retrieval of emails later can be time-consuming and downright frustrating if the subject line isn’t clear. Examples:

  • New vacation policy starts Friday

  • Here's the annual president's address to employees

  • Announcing the addition of new partner

3. Make it easy to browse.

  • Use subheads to help the reader find the section pertinent to him or her.

  • Use bullets instead of paragraphs.

  • Underline, highlight, or change font colors on the key point (deadline, cost increase, action needed).

  • Make action items and next steps stand out visually (in the subject line, when appropriate).

  • If more detailed backstory is imperative, indicate where the reader can find it. Title it clearly and put it at the end, so only those who want it can find it.

4. Give your reader just-in-time information.
Many readers prefer to focus on just the next step, rather than the next 10 steps. Most don’t have time to save it and review it over a period of months as it becomes relevant.

See four more tips here.


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Podcasts are being used for internal communication because they fit nicely between text and video—giving employees content to listen to while engaged in other activities that don't require visual focus. Whether doing chores, or exercising, people increasingly crave content to enrich life's more mundane activities. 

A podcast:

  • Can be authentic and believable

  • Can feature voices of employees

  • Can personalize leaders

Podcasts are a versatile tool, but companies that use them will need to have an effective delivery channel (think apps and e-letters).


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E-letters are more sophisticated versions of emails that aren't used for daily interactions, but for important messages. And according to Gatehouse's internal communication State of the Sector report, 84% of companies surveyed report using it, making it third among most-used digital channels by employees. 

Because e-letters are developed using third-party services, they offer vastly better design options, great analytics, and mailing list management. Their ability to preserve the look of an email is higher than regular emails, making them much more engaging once they are opened. But like all email, they must compete with an increasingly full inbox. 

Here are the first three of 14 tips we offer for creating e-letter emails that employees will engage with:

  1. Use a third-party tool. It would be nearly impossible to create the essential features that these tools now offer, from sophisticated designs to insightful analytics, automated features that help you manage and grow your lists, and mobile optimization. We use Campaign Monitor, but there are others to choose from, as well.

  2. Use great design. A reader makes a split-second decision about whether to engage with your email based on how it looks. Good design will absolutely increase your readership.

  3. Curate content with care. Make sure that your distribution lists and topics are right for each other.

Want to learn more? You can find the rest of the tips here


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An intranet is a website that is only accessible to authorized viewers—usually your employees. Ninety-three percent of companies report using their intranet as a channel of communication, making it second only to emails, according to Gatehouse.

An intranet can be a solid framework for employee communication—allowing your teams to share content like news, blogs, forms, messages, team workspaces, directories, and training material.  

Although an intranet has the ability to reach your entire workforce, because the quality varies widely its effectiveness is highly impacted by the user interface, design, and content.


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Yes, your walls can talk! They are free communication channels that can reach employees and customers many times a day. Think of them as ideal places to communicate some of your most timeless messages—your mission, your history, your values. 

Walls are versatile and suitable for digital as well as traditional messages. If your main traffic areas aren't delivering your signature messages to your team, it's time to make use of these targeted channels.


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Portable displays are good for targeting specific messages that need to be shared in different locations. Celebrating a prestigious award? Reinforcing your new mission statement? Announcing a new service for employees? A display can make the rounds to departments and employee events to spread the word.


Screens dominate our workplace—and provide an affordable way to deliver messages, so it only makes sense to use them as an internal communication channel.

Whether it's repurposing videos or infographics on a wall monitor or showcasing your mission or values as screensavers, never underestimate the simple, hard-working nature of using your company's screens to deliver signature messages. 


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We don't need a study to tell us that in-person communication is the most effective channel.

But did you know that communication from direct managers is the most effective channel for reaching employees, according to a CEB survey of more than 1,000 employees?

Since so much of communication is conveyed in nonverbal cues, in-person message delivery provides more information to take in like eyes, body language and voice tone. And, we know that emotions are contagious—and much easier to deliver in person than in print.

Companies that are serious about internal communication should focus on training and resourcing their managers and leaders in communication.


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Forums and meetings are effective ways to deliver your ideas because of their ability to combine in-person communication with other effective channels. They offer the increased efficiency of one to many, maximizing the time of busy leaders. 

But like other channels, this one is only as good as the content. So here are some tips on making live meetings work better:

  • Coordinate messages: If you have multiple speakers, have someone review all of them with an eye toward the entire event—and edit out redundancy.

  • Focus: Leaders have a tendency to want to share a great deal of content, so create time limits and help them focus on unpacking their one big idea. Too much content can prevent hearers from remembering the most important ideas.

  • Variety: To work, events like this need to be created with a nod to theater and experience, engaging the senses with variety, taking breaks, involving the audience, and creating time for reflection and personal application.

  • Include video: This provides a welcome break to talking heads.


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Newsletters, magazines, and other print channels aren't dead, but complement your digital channels.

They:

  • Help reach non-desk employees

  • Are easily shared

  • Are good for the pick-up-since-it's-handy impulse

  • Can be repurposed digitally

Since they can be more costly than other channels and are harder to measure than many digital options, use them in situations where other channels aren't effective.


There are times when a simple letter from a manager is actually effective—like when the message itself is compelling and doesn't require a lot of visual support. Think things like a positive change in benefits or other things that have a high personal impact on employees. It can be easy to forget this lowly channel, but its affordability and suitability for certain kinds of communications should keep it on your list as an option for occasional use.

To make this effective, however, personalize the letter as much as you can. If it's truly from the president, it won't need much added visual treatment.


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Upon occasion, it will make sense to send something to your employees' homes. Whether it's a reminder postcard, a newsletter, an invitation, or a simple letter, employees have more time to read at home than they do at work. And, if it's a high-impact message, it won't hurt to have it available for other members of the family who might be interested.

 
 
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Persuade Shareholders

An annual report is one of a company’s most vital communication tools. The colors, design and images in your annual report should all support your key messages—and should inspire confidence among shareholders and readers alike.

Not sure if your annual report is living up to its full potential?

  • See how it compares visually to your top competitors’ annual reports.

  • Grade your photos. If that’s all the readers see, what would they think about your company?

  • Browse it. If you read only pictures, captions, subheads and headlines, what will you know about your organization?

Need some inspiration? >>  


Dress up your presentation in style to convey confidence and success, like this package we helped develop for a CEO’s presentation at their annual shareholder’s meeting. Energetic colors, bold design and a mix of media—to keep the presentation alive—tell the company’s story and build support.

Presentation Video

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Want to inspire confidence? Create a compelling and clear vision? In this package, we’ve helped the client pay attention to these three critical factors:

  1. First impressions. Good design can help you create packaging that instantly conveys your message—without saying a word.

  2. Design. Great design is a strategic advantage. Regardless of your industry, clients expect it—and judge your company by it. Like any skill, great design is best achieved by someone who understands your business goals and who has spent a lifetime perfecting their skills. It rarely pays to risk your visual appearance to a novice.

  3. Attention span. As this gets shorter and shorter, presenters have to make it easier and easier to grasp a message. Variety can help here, too. In this package, we provide a short video to break up the in-person presentation. Video is a great way to add punch to any presentation, as it engages more of the senses with music and arresting images.

So whether your audience is a shareholder, customer or employee—use the tools of professional communicators to make you and your company more credible and successful.

Key Technology Video

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2013 Annual Report

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Investor Capacity Folder

Investor PowerPoint Presentation

Client Showcase: Award-winning Annual Report Features Fresh Imagery

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For more than a decade we’ve partnered with Key Technology to produce their annual report. And for the second year in a row, their annual report has been listed in the Top 100 winners gallery in the 2010-2011 international LACP Visions Awards Annual Report Competition. Number 29 on the list, it was selected from more than 5,000 entries across all categories—and from 24 countries.

The Top 100 list included companies like Korean Air, Hyundai, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Walmart (Mexico/Central America), Qualcomm, Charles Schwab and Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu.

The report also garnered the Platinum Award, the highest of four awards offered, for annual reports in its industry category. A panel of professional judges scored the project on eight aspects ranging from first impressions to message clarity.

This year’s report cover image suggests both the international nature of their company and how their technologies benefit the consumer by bringing us fresher, purer products. We love the power of the image and its utter simplicity—made more notable by generous use of white space and use of vibrant colors inside.

LACP is the League of American Communications Professionals that helps promote best-in-class practices in communications.

Client Showcase: Key Technology Annual Report

In this year's annual report, the color orange anchors Key Technology's 2009 Annual Report and sends a message of vibrancy, innovation and energy—all characteristics of this market leader. Beautiful, saturated images of food help depict one of the primary markets impacted by this company—a world-wide leader in equipment that processes, sorts and removes defects from food and pharmaceuticals to ensure product safety and freshness.

The image of the executive team, shot from an elevated platform, delivers a fresh perspective that suggests both optimism and confidence.

Client Showcase: 2008 Key Technology Annual Report

One of the pleasures of running this company is the wonderful long-standing relationships we have had with our clients. For a decade now, Key Technology has partnered with us to produce their annual report. With products at work on six continents, they're the world leader in developing equipment that processes, sorts and removes defects from food and pharmaceuticals—ensuring safer, fresher and purer products are supplied to people around the world. Each year we have the pleasure of working with this group of talented individuals to tell their corporate story. We love this project because it often allows us to showcase food, which is such a beautiful subject.

Their 2008 report features a custom die-cut cover and gloss spot UV finish that depicts the impact of Key's products on the food market. The shot of their executive team was taken in one of the beautiful vineyards of the Walla Walla valley just before dusk, when the light is warm and beautiful, making the background look as though it was painted.